Backpacking Saws

TrailBlazer Sawvivor

THE BEST COLLAPSIBLE SAW

Here’s our pick for the best collapsible backpacking saw on the market today.  Unbeatable performance, light weight, and a proven design.

The best low-cost, high-quality folding saw

THE BEST FOLDING SAW

Folding saws don’t cut as fast as collapsible saws, but they’re smaller and lighter when space in your pack is at a premium.  Plus, they deploy more quickly.

Kabar Bowie

THE BEST OUTDOORS KNIFE

You need a large-blade knife for splitting logs into kindling, or for shaving dry wood into tinder.  This KaBar is big and tough, but the price is sweet.

Magnesium Fire Starter

THE BEST FIRE STARTER KIT

Forget the flint and steel fire starters.  They don’t work well in damp and/or windy weather.  This magnesium fire starter outperforms flint and steel in any climate.

SaberCut Saw

THE BEST FLEXIBLE SAW

If you want an ultra-light flexible saw for emergencies, this pocket chain saw is our favorite.  Flexible saws are good emergency survival tools to throw in your car.

WetFire Tinder

THE BEST TINDER

This emergency fire starter is the best tinder you can get: it’s standard issue in military survival kits.  It works in wet, windy, and cold conditions.

   

While backpacking in the back country, you need to be able to cut wood. Whether you want to prepare firewood for cooking or comfort or construct an emergency shelter or signal fire, a backpacking saw gives you the options you need.

Compared to an axe or hatchet, a good camping saw is lighter, safer, and easier to pack.

Here’s what you want in a camping saw:

  • Light weight
  • Compact storage
  • No sharp edges exposed in storage or while being carried
  • Good cutting performance on different materials
  • Ease of use, quick set up and disassembly
  • Reasonable price

Here at BackpackingSaw.Com, we give you the rundown on manufacturers, models, features, real-world performance, and more.

Even if you’re just out on a day-hike and you don’t anticipate the need to start a fire or build a shelter, it’s still a good idea to be prepared.  Better safe than sorry, and at less than a pound, there’s very little reason not to take a backpacking saw along for the trip, just in case.